Every 15 Minutes Returns after Break

Students+from+last+year%27s+SADD+event+participate+in+Every+15+Minutes%2C+which+simulates+deaths+from+destructive+decisions.

File

Students from last year's SADD event participate in Every 15 Minutes, which simulates deaths from destructive decisions.

Jessica Villalobos-Quintero, Sports Editor

Every 15 minutes, also known as SADD was brought to Centennial in order to make kids aware of the consequences that making a destructive decisions like drinking and driving can lead to.

Every year,  seniors apply and 25 are chosen to be a part of this group through April 12-14. They are asked a series of questions like, “Why would you like to participate?” “How would it impact your peers?”.

According to receptionist  Shelley Johnson & activity director Ehren Schneider, they try to pick a diverse  group, not just popular kids. They want students who will have an impact on other students. “It’s a really wonderful program, it doesn’t matter what happened,but what you voice out to your peers,” said Johnson.
  On the day  of the event students are pulled out of class, given a red rose, paint their face white and their eyes black, and wear a black gown to mimic the dead. All 25 students will walk around school dressed in their black gowns and painted faces. Each student will have a memorial in front of the showcase box.

The 25 students will visit a funeral home and a car crash site. During their trip to a funeral home, they are shown the rooms for the medical examiner (parents come to identify the body), the process of sewing back together certain parts of a body and the makeup put on them. For those who wish to be cremated, their bodies go in a brick “oven”, burned until bones are the only thing left, then grind their bones, and put in a box for their parents.

All students will spend the night at a hotel, write a letter to their parents, and talk with their peers.

On April 13, there will be a mock car crash in the parking lot during 10th period. This event is traditional for the juniors and seniors as one last reminder to make safe decisions.